Treating Eczema

pictures of eczema-1

Treating eczema is still a mystery, despite the fact that it affects over 15% of the world’s population. In fact, the causes of eczema are still unknown – which makes finding a treatment almost impossible.

What Does Eczema Look Like?

While the signs and symptoms of eczema will vary depending on the person and other factors, the most common symptoms of eczema include dry, red patches on the skin.

Some may experience oozing and weeping, scaly and flaking, and sometimes even blisters. Eczema may appear on the face, foot, scalp………almost anywhere on the body.

Types of Eczema

Asteatotic eczema - This type of eczema is characterized by dry, cracked, scaling skin with a fissure like pattern -- similar to badly cracked sidewalk or a glazed vase. This type of eczema is generally more common in older people and is more common in areas with less oil secretion – like the lower legs.

Dyshidrotic eczema - This condition is characterized by small blisters on the feet or hands and affects the fingers, palms and soles. The symptoms of this condition include uncomfortable sensations of itching and pain.

Nummular eczema - Symptoms of this type of eczema include a persistent itchy rash that shows up as round shaped patches on the skin. Sometimes these patches may clear up in the middle leaving a scaly ring that resembles ring worm.

Pseudomonas Dermatitis Eczema - This type of eczema is sometimes called Hot Tub Rash. It usually starts from swimming in contaminate lakes or dirty hot tubs. It's usually caused by fungal growth, but it's not as bad as it sounds.

Seborheic Dermatitis - Seborheic eczema is often associated with cradle cap and effects the scalp...sometimes the face and back too.

Eczema herpeticum - This condition is more commonly known as atopic dermatitis which sometimes develops into a condition called eczema herpeticum (EH). This condition often occurs in children. It generally shows up in those who are already affected by dermatitis or psoriasis.

Treating Eczema - Home Remedies For Eczema

Treating eczema is often difficult and usually requires nasty prescription medications like corticosteroids to help relive inflammation, itching, and scaly skin patches.

Regardless if you require medication or not there are some "home remedies" for eczema -- at least ones that don't require toxic drugs. For example, weekly cold compresses or soaks can help relive pain and itching.

Watch this informative video on Eczema treatment.



Natural Home Remedies For Eczema


Your skin reacts to every it comes in contact with, this is especially true with those suffering from eczema because the skin barrier is already damaged -- your skin has no defense. So what can you do?

As a health advisor and research consultant for over 25 years, I make every effort to find solutions for a variety of skin problems, especially eczema.

It seems that when people with eczema kept their skin routine as simple and natural as possible, they had a significant reduction in symptoms and flare-ups.

It's important to use the proper topical skin products. Wash your skin with only with gentle pH balanced cleansers - like an eczema soap - and keep it moisturized and hydrated - preferably with moisturizers or lotions designed for eczema skin.

Never use regular soap, lotions, or moisturizers. It's important that your skin products are not only gentle to the skin, but also chemical free. Try to avoid herbicides, fertilizers, fragrances, and preservatives if possible.

Other steps you can take to treat eczema is consider:

  • Take Cool Oatmeal Baths - This helps to sooth inflamed skin and dryness.
  • Take Vitamin E and Fish Oil capsules- Vitamin E helps to keep the skin moist and encourages healing from within. Studies show that 5.5 grams of fish oil (DHA) significantly improved symptoms of atopic eczema after only 8 weeks.


  • Click here for more suggestions about natural eczema treatments



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    (video of eczema courtesy of http://www.mayoclinic.org/dermatitis)